edmund burkes speech on conciliation with the colonies

Edmund Burkes Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies

            Edmund Burke’s ideology about the existence of state for the people is evidently present during his speech about conciliation about the Colonies. Burke believes that the state should work for the people and not for the people to work for the state (Auerbach, 1959, p. 57). Corruption on the side of the state blinded the opportunity for the government to work and play its role.

            Political crisis involving colonies encourage Burke to pursue his principles and philosophical spirit about governance. Burke demonstrates that the power of democracy is in the great hands of the masses which also as great as the threat brought by hands of a dictator leader. There are two parties, the left and right which are present for every issue which divides the state and the governance (Bork, 1997, p. 353).

            Men by nature will always seek advantage over one another. Thus, the state needs to safeguard inequalities that may arise. The differences in each side must not be overstated nor must it be discounted. Heeding the cry of those who are against the state will create a more terrible sight that later will confront mankind. Each state has established their laws which govern its people and the state. Giving more importance with civil rights that protects the public from being harass or maltreated, this instrument of justice must embody full fairness and impartiality among men.

            Burke implies that a single man can make a change for the good cause of all. He must be alone in his dogma but he doesn’t care, all he wants is to open the eyes of the people ruling the state. He doesn’t need any kind of sympathy but he is counting on his voice to reach the concerned English men.

            People will always seek liberty in all aspect of his or her life. Give importance with the freedom of the people, and they will cuddle the government (White, 2002, p. 62). Responsible governance is all that it takes to create a harmonious relationship of men and the government. The more freedom the state gives to its people, the more they will respect the former.

            Democracy has its own toll when implemented among men. The political system must realize that the power of the masses has a potential to struggle and fight back against false dichotomy. During Burke’s time, the doctrine of good governance requires a mounting courage in pronouncing its true essence especially in a public location. No wonder, Burke had his way out of the league spending most of his years in accomplishing an impeachment against the Governor-General of India.

            Corruption upon alliance of states grew much faster allowing extended term in the office and it killed the fundamental nature of the existence of the English statesmanship. Dependence of each Colony from any form of slavery is an integral part to have a prosperous economic reputation.

            Denial of the power of the people is a waste of time and energy. Moreover, this will only facilitate a shaky relationship among men and the state. If the people fed their imagination that they were being neglected by the state, then the state is in great danger. Allegiance of Colonies does not aim for any kind of slavery thus it can’t stand the pain that his people are held by vicious hands.

            The more people believe on the fair game set by the state, the more the state becomes stronger. The populace invest their trust with the government; therefore, the government must be obliged to be the guardians of trusts whom can protect the people’s concern.

            “English Constitution binds the people and the state. No one may arise greater of one another (Conway, 2003, p. 136).” Constitutions are based on the universal principle of impartiality and justices. Hence, they are not derive from the thin air. Political climate set the direction of these constitutions and when such climate changes, the constitution have a character to transcend its course to serve the present generation at its fullest.

            All constitutions are structured based on certain priorities and particular choices that are necessary in building a nation. Without constitution, men will be like a wild animal that would kill, eat and destroy innocent people regardless of their ages. Historically, constitutions have been revolutionized because of different political ideas and political agendas. Written constitutional texts thought by many politicians are enough to amend the people’s view on the justice system. Political tranquillity can’t conceal the nation’s hostility about the progression of corruption predominantly on the people’s taxes (Miller, 1994, p. 120).

            Burke demands the people who are occupying the seats in the government to work for the interest of all citizens of the state. He commented on the extravagance of the royal household while many were dying and suffering.

            History reflects on men’s divine purpose over his fellow men. Burke has a strong belief that those people in the public office must be restrained from excessive use of their power to persuade people. Rather, they should showcase the principal virtue of self-control.

Burke’s writings and speeches are solid manifestations of his confidence that men are all equal in the eyes of God. His devotion for personal freedom opposing constitutional changes that are harmful to humankind linked him as a righteous Englishman who believes in the power of liberty.

At the end of his speech, Burke is expecting for some favorable action on side of the state and the people comprising the colony. Challenges may arise before his political and social principles have taken into shape but it will not move Mr. Burke to step down from what he believes.

His heart, mind and soul are set to experience positive changes done in his own land. Royal and political hitches will come across his way on guiding the people of what he is fighting for but it doesn’t matter as long as he believes in his own acts. His undying faith caters his opinion that it would not take long before his homeland realizes that plebs is as important as the aristocrat people. Offices in the government are created to provide the public with security, it is not provided by the public to pierce on their backs and kill their free will.

References

Auerbach, Morton M. (1959). The Conservative Illusion. USA: Columbia, University Press.

Bork, Robert H. (1997). The Tempting of America: The Political Seduction of the Law. USA: Simon & Schuster.

Conway, David (2003). In Defence of the Realm: The Place of Nations in Classical Liberalism. USA: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Miller, Peter N. (1994). Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion, and Philosophy in Eighteenth-century Britain. USA: Cambridge University Press.

White, Stephen K. (2002). Edmund Burke: Modernity, Politics and Aesthetics. USA: Rowman & Littlefield.

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